The National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial

Visit the memorial dedicated to the lives that were lost at the Pentagon during the attacks that occurred on September 11th, 2001. Julie Beckman and Keith Kaseman designed the memorial, and it was unveiled exactly seven years after the tragedy. The layout of the memorial is based on year of birth, arranged on an age line. The 184 victims of the attack are marked by “Memorial Units” with the victim’s age and location at the time of the attack.

contact info

Hrs: Daily 24 hours.

School

Groups can also see the Crape Myrtle trees that surround the memorial and the pools of water reflecting light in the evenings next to each unit. Through exhibits and educational programs complemented by docent and walking audio tours, the 9/11 Pentagon Memorial Visitor Education Center groups will connect with those who experienced 9/11, understand how we as a nation have changed and persevered, learn about the Pentagon and why it was targeted, learn about what we are doing to prevent future attacks.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
American History, Government, Heritage.

contact info
Phone: 703-697-7351
Email: info@pentagonmemorial.net

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School, High School, College Program Type: Day Trips, Self-Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 30-45 minutes. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: No.

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

The National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial

Visit the memorial dedicated to the lives that were lost at the Pentagon during the attacks that occurred on September 11th, 2001. Julie Beckman and Keith Kaseman designed the memorial, and it was unveiled exactly seven years after the tragedy. The layout of the memorial is based on year of birth, arranged on an age line. The 184 victims of the attack are marked by “Memorial Units” with the victim’s age and location at the time of the attack.

contact info

Hrs: Daily 24 hours.

Scouts

Groups can also see the Crape Myrtle trees that surround the memorial and the pools of water reflecting light in the evenings next to each unit. Through exhibits and educational programs complemented by docent and walking audio tours, the 9/11 Pentagon Memorial Visitor Education Center groups will connect with those who experienced 9/11, understand how we as a nation have changed and persevered, learn about the Pentagon and why it was targeted, learn about what we are doing to prevent future attacks.

supports scout badges in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
American History, Government, Heritage.

contact info
Phone: 703-697-7351
Email: info@pentagonmemorial.net

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School, High School, College Program Type: Day Trips, Self-Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 30-45 minutes. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: No.

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

The National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial

Visit the memorial dedicated to the lives that were lost at the Pentagon during the attacks that occurred on September 11th, 2001. Julie Beckman and Keith Kaseman designed the memorial, and it was unveiled exactly seven years after the tragedy. The layout of the memorial is based on year of birth, arranged on an age line. The 184 victims of the attack are marked by “Memorial Units” with the victim’s age and location at the time of the attack.

contact info

Hrs: Daily 24 hours.

Camp

Groups can also see the Crape Myrtle trees that surround the memorial and the pools of water reflecting light in the evenings next to each unit. Through exhibits and educational programs complemented by docent and walking audio tours, the 9/11 Pentagon Memorial Visitor Education Center groups will connect with those who experienced 9/11, understand how we as a nation have changed and persevered, learn about the Pentagon and why it was targeted, learn about what we are doing to prevent future attacks.

topics covered:
American History, Government, Heritage.

contact info
Phone: 703-697-7351
Email: info@pentagonmemorial.net

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School, High School, College Program Type: Day Trips, Self-Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 30-45 minutes. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: No.

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

The National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial

Visit the memorial dedicated to the lives that were lost at the Pentagon during the attacks that occurred on September 11th, 2001. Julie Beckman and Keith Kaseman designed the memorial, and it was unveiled exactly seven years after the tragedy. The layout of the memorial is based on year of birth, arranged on an age line. The 184 victims of the attack are marked by “Memorial Units” with the victim’s age and location at the time of the attack.

contact info

Hrs: Daily 24 hours.

Homeschool

Groups can also see the Crape Myrtle trees that surround the memorial and the pools of water reflecting light in the evenings next to each unit. Through exhibits and educational programs complemented by docent and walking audio tours, the 9/11 Pentagon Memorial Visitor Education Center groups will connect with those who experienced 9/11, understand how we as a nation have changed and persevered, learn about the Pentagon and why it was targeted, learn about what we are doing to prevent future attacks.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
American History, Government, Heritage.

contact info
Phone: 703-697-7351
Email: info@pentagonmemorial.net

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School, High School, College Program Type: Day Trips, Self-Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 30-45 minutes. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: No.

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

e-newsletter

Sign up and receive information on discounts and grants for field trips in your area.

We’ve moved from ClassTrips.com and CampDirectorsResources.com

Welcome to our new site

FieldTripDirectory.com