Students

School groups are invited to explore the apparent motions of the sun and circumpolar constellations, celestial navigation, seasonal skies, and the mechanics and structure of the solar system and the universe. Programs include basic orbital mechanics, explanations of meridian, zenith, ecliptic, and celestial coordinates, solstices and equinoxes, identification of constellations, and more. Students should feel free to ask their tour guide about astronomy and space travel!

supports classroom learning in:
Science.

topics covered:
Planets, Solar System, Technology.

contact info
Name: Alfred Venne
Email: avenne@amherst.edu

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 10 min., 60 max. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: Varies. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1 Registration: Online, Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: No. Accessible To: VI, HI, LD, ASD.

About  This Venue

Bassett Planetarium

For more than fifty years, Bassett Planetarium, located in Morgan Hall, has provided programs about the night sky to Amherst and Five College classes, and to regional community organizations and school groups. Gifted to Amherst College by Preston R. Bassett, class of 1913, in the 1950s, the Planetarium is the perfect place to learn about the heavens.

contact info

Hrs: September-June By appointment.

You May Find These Lesson Plans Helpful

Prepared by Field Trip Directory

Planetarium Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Earth has more exposed water than land.  Three quarters of the Earth is covered by water! The earth has one moon.

Venus is the brightest planet in our sky and can sometimes be seen with the naked eye if you know where to look.  It is the solar system’s brightest planet — yellow clouds of sulfuric acid reflect the sun’s light.

Jupiter is so big that you could fit all the other planets in the solar system inside it.

Pluto is no longer considered a planet — instead, astronomers call it a dwarf planet or planetoid.

View Lesson Plan>>

Scouts

Scout groups are invited to explore the apparent motions of the sun and circumpolar constellations, celestial navigation, seasonal skies, and the mechanics and structure of the solar system and the universe. Programs include basic orbital mechanics, explanations of meridian, zenith, ecliptic, and celestial coordinates, solstices and equinoxes, identification of constellations, and more. Scouts should feel free to ask their tour guide about astronomy and space travel!

supports scout badges in:
Science.

topics covered:
Planets, Solar System, Technology.

contact info
Name: Alfred Venne
Email: avenne@amherst.edu

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 10 min., 60 max. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: Varies. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1 Registration: Online, Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: No. Accessible To: VI, HI, LD, ASD.

About  This Venue

Bassett Planetarium

For more than fifty years, Bassett Planetarium, located in Morgan Hall, has provided programs about the night sky to Amherst and Five College classes, and to regional community organizations and school groups. Gifted to Amherst College by Preston R. Bassett, class of 1913, in the 1950s, the Planetarium is the perfect place to learn about the heavens.

contact info

Hrs: September-June By appointment.

You May Find These Lesson Plans Helpful

Prepared by Field Trip Directory

Planetarium Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Earth has more exposed water than land.  Three quarters of the Earth is covered by water! The earth has one moon.

Venus is the brightest planet in our sky and can sometimes be seen with the naked eye if you know where to look.  It is the solar system’s brightest planet — yellow clouds of sulfuric acid reflect the sun’s light.

Jupiter is so big that you could fit all the other planets in the solar system inside it.

Pluto is no longer considered a planet — instead, astronomers call it a dwarf planet or planetoid.

View Lesson Plan>>

Homeschool

Homeschool groups are invited to explore the apparent motions of the sun and circumpolar constellations, celestial navigation, seasonal skies, and the mechanics and structure of the solar system and the universe. Programs include basic orbital mechanics, explanations of meridian, zenith, ecliptic, and celestial coordinates, solstices and equinoxes, identification of constellations, and more. Students should feel free to ask their tour guide about astronomy and space travel!

supports classroom learning in:
Science.

topics covered:
Planets, Solar System, Technology.

contact info
Name: Alfred Venne
Email: avenne@amherst.edu

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 10 min., 60 max. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: Varies. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1 Registration: Online, Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: No. Accessible To: VI, HI, LD, ASD.

About  This Venue

Bassett Planetarium

For more than fifty years, Bassett Planetarium, located in Morgan Hall, has provided programs about the night sky to Amherst and Five College classes, and to regional community organizations and school groups. Gifted to Amherst College by Preston R. Bassett, class of 1913, in the 1950s, the Planetarium is the perfect place to learn about the heavens.

contact info

Hrs: September-June By appointment.

You May Find These Lesson Plans Helpful

Prepared by Field Trip Directory

Planetarium Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Earth has more exposed water than land.  Three quarters of the Earth is covered by water! The earth has one moon.

Venus is the brightest planet in our sky and can sometimes be seen with the naked eye if you know where to look.  It is the solar system’s brightest planet — yellow clouds of sulfuric acid reflect the sun’s light.

Jupiter is so big that you could fit all the other planets in the solar system inside it.

Pluto is no longer considered a planet — instead, astronomers call it a dwarf planet or planetoid.

View Lesson Plan>>

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