Duke Homestead State Historic Site and Tobacco Museum

Visit the historic site where George Washington Duke grew tobacco and started one of the largest American tobacco companies. Located in Durham, North Carolina, Duke Homestead features the 1869 Washington Duke's Third Tobacco Factory, a tobacco-curing barn, the 1852 Duke House, and a tobacco pack house. The homestead offers guided house tours a quarter before and after every hour, with a look at museum exhibits and a 17-minute orientation film. The museum’s 5,500 square feet of exhibits focus on the tobacco industry, the history of tobacco, the decrease in the number of family farms, and more. Living history programs are available for students, scouts, homeschoolers and campers of elementary school age.

contact info

Hrs: Tues.-Fri. 9AM-5PM.

School

Duke Homestead’s tours and living history programs allow students to witness the daily lives of 19th-century farmers. Students exploring the home will engage with costumed interpreters and discuss the lives of the Duke family members as they draw connections between what life was like then versus now. Students can also examine artifacts, delve into 19th-century fashion, try churning butter, play town ball, and more. Brochures are available for self-guided tours. Be sure to pack bagged lunches to eat in the site’s picnic area. Field trips must be reserved at least two weeks in advance.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
Farming, economics, business, politics, history, historical figures, culture, art.

contact info
Name: Reservations
Phone: 919-627-6990

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 10 minimum, 100 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1. Registration: Online, Phone. Food Options: Bring Your Own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Fee Accessible To: PD.

Living History Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Two hundred thousand Civil War soldiers were boys no older than 16, and an estimated 300 women were brave enough to disguise themselves as men and fight in the war. The average soldier weighed only 145 pounds due to poor diet, long marches, disease, and tough living, and earned between $13-$16 per month. Reading about these facts is interesting, but actually living them makes the information come alive. Living History Centers can allow students to experience how people lived during important historical eras, including enlisting as a soldier during the Civil War.

View Lesson Plan>>

Duke Homestead State Historic Site and Tobacco Museum

Visit the historic site where George Washington Duke grew tobacco and started one of the largest American tobacco companies. Located in Durham, North Carolina, Duke Homestead features the 1869 Washington Duke's Third Tobacco Factory, a tobacco-curing barn, the 1852 Duke House, and a tobacco pack house. The homestead offers guided house tours a quarter before and after every hour, with a look at museum exhibits and a 17-minute orientation film. The museum’s 5,500 square feet of exhibits focus on the tobacco industry, the history of tobacco, the decrease in the number of family farms, and more. Living history programs are available for students, scouts, homeschoolers and campers of elementary school age.

contact info

Hrs: Tues.-Fri. 9AM-5PM.

Scouts

Scout groups can work on a variety of history-related badges on field trips to Duke Homestead. While exploring the home, scouts will engage with costumed interpreters and discuss the lives of members of the Duke family as they draw connections between life today versus life in the 19th century. Scouts will also examine artifacts, delve into 19th-century fashion, churn butter, play a game of town ball, and more. Brochures are available for self-guided tours. Pack bagged lunches to eat in the site’s picnic area. Scouts are welcome to attend special events and tours such as the Harvest & Hornworm Festival and Mythbusting Day: Historic House Myths.

supports scout badges in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
Farming, economics, business, politics, history, historical figures, culture, art.

contact info
Name: Reservations
Phone: 919-627-6990

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 10 minimum, 100 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1. Registration: Online, Phone. Food Options: Bring Your Own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Fee Accessible To: PD.

Living History Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Two hundred thousand Civil War soldiers were boys no older than 16, and an estimated 300 women were brave enough to disguise themselves as men and fight in the war. The average soldier weighed only 145 pounds due to poor diet, long marches, disease, and tough living, and earned between $13-$16 per month. Reading about these facts is interesting, but actually living them makes the information come alive. Living History Centers can allow students to experience how people lived during important historical eras, including enlisting as a soldier during the Civil War.

View Lesson Plan>>

Duke Homestead State Historic Site and Tobacco Museum

Visit the historic site where George Washington Duke grew tobacco and started one of the largest American tobacco companies. Located in Durham, North Carolina, Duke Homestead features the 1869 Washington Duke's Third Tobacco Factory, a tobacco-curing barn, the 1852 Duke House, and a tobacco pack house. The homestead offers guided house tours a quarter before and after every hour, with a look at museum exhibits and a 17-minute orientation film. The museum’s 5,500 square feet of exhibits focus on the tobacco industry, the history of tobacco, the decrease in the number of family farms, and more. Living history programs are available for students, scouts, homeschoolers and campers of elementary school age.

contact info

Hrs: Tues.-Fri. 9AM-5PM.

Camp

Summer camp groups will enjoy a living history-filled day while learning about 19th-century farm life at Duke Homestead. On tours of the home, campers will engage with costumed interpreters and discuss the lives of the Duke family members as they make comparisons between what life was like then versus now. Campers can also examine artifacts, explore the fashions of the 19th century, play town ball, try churning butter, and more. Brochures are available for camp groups that wish to tour self-guided. Bring bagged lunches to eat in the site’s picnic area. Field trips must be booked at least two weeks ahead.

contact info
Name: Reservations
Phone: 919-627-6990

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 10 minimum, 100 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1. Registration: Online, Phone. Food Options: Bring Your Own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Fee Accessible To: PD.

Living History Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Two hundred thousand Civil War soldiers were boys no older than 16, and an estimated 300 women were brave enough to disguise themselves as men and fight in the war. The average soldier weighed only 145 pounds due to poor diet, long marches, disease, and tough living, and earned between $13-$16 per month. Reading about these facts is interesting, but actually living them makes the information come alive. Living History Centers can allow students to experience how people lived during important historical eras, including enlisting as a soldier during the Civil War.

View Lesson Plan>>

Duke Homestead State Historic Site and Tobacco Museum

Visit the historic site where George Washington Duke grew tobacco and started one of the largest American tobacco companies. Located in Durham, North Carolina, Duke Homestead features the 1869 Washington Duke's Third Tobacco Factory, a tobacco-curing barn, the 1852 Duke House, and a tobacco pack house. The homestead offers guided house tours a quarter before and after every hour, with a look at museum exhibits and a 17-minute orientation film. The museum’s 5,500 square feet of exhibits focus on the tobacco industry, the history of tobacco, the decrease in the number of family farms, and more. Living history programs are available for students, scouts, homeschoolers and campers of elementary school age.

contact info

Hrs: Tues.-Fri. 9AM-5PM.

Homeschool

Duke Homestead’s tours and living history programs allow homeschoolers to witness the daily lives of 19th-century farmers. While exploring the home, homeschoolers will engage with costumed interpreters and discuss the lives of the Duke family members as they compare and contrast 19th-century life to the present day. Students can also delve into the fashions of the 1800s, try churning butter, examine artifacts, play town ball, and more. Brochures are available for homeschool groups that wish to take self-guided tours of Duke Homestead. Pack bagged lunches to eat in the site’s picnic area. Field trips must be booked at least two weeks in advance.

topics covered:
Social studies, farming, economics, business, politics, history, historical figures, culture, art.

contact info
Name: Reservations
Phone: 919-627-6990

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 10 minimum, 100 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 6:1. Registration: Online, Phone. Food Options: Bring Your Own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Fee Accessible To: PD.

Living History Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Two hundred thousand Civil War soldiers were boys no older than 16, and an estimated 300 women were brave enough to disguise themselves as men and fight in the war. The average soldier weighed only 145 pounds due to poor diet, long marches, disease, and tough living, and earned between $13-$16 per month. Reading about these facts is interesting, but actually living them makes the information come alive. Living History Centers can allow students to experience how people lived during important historical eras, including enlisting as a soldier during the Civil War.

View Lesson Plan>>

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