General Grant National Memorial

This National Memorial is the resting place of Ulysses S. Grant and his wife, Julia. As commanding general of the Union Army, Grant’s efforts brought about the end of the Civil War; he was elected the 18th President of the United Sates in 1868, and was re-elected in 1872. The tomb is the largest mausoleum in the United States, and is constructed out of marble and granite. Over one million people attended its dedication ceremony on April 27, 1897. Today, visitors can tour the Memorial to learn about architecture, the Civil War, and Grant’s life and impact on American society.

contact info

Hrs: Vary.

School

Students can tour the General Grant National Memorial and learn the story of its construction, architecture, purpose, and significance. As they explore, they can learn about the reasons why Grant was memorialized, and compare the style of the tomb with earlier and later ones. They can also learn about its exhibits and legends, and discover who was buried in the tomb.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies, Visual Arts

topics covered:
architecture, Civil War, government, history

contact info
Name: General Grant National Memorial
Phone: 212-666-1640.
Email: gegr_infor@nps.gov

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 45-60 minutes. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Email, Fax. Food Options: n/a. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: n/a. Accessible To: n/a.

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

General Grant National Memorial

This National Memorial is the resting place of Ulysses S. Grant and his wife, Julia. As commanding general of the Union Army, Grant’s efforts brought about the end of the Civil War; he was elected the 18th President of the United Sates in 1868, and was re-elected in 1872. The tomb is the largest mausoleum in the United States, and is constructed out of marble and granite. Over one million people attended its dedication ceremony on April 27, 1897. Today, visitors can tour the Memorial to learn about architecture, the Civil War, and Grant’s life and impact on American society.

contact info

Hrs: Vary.

Camp

Campers can tour the General Grant National Memorial and learn the story of its construction, architecture, purpose, and significance. As they explore, they can learn about the reasons why Grant was memorialized, and compare the style of the tomb with earlier and later ones. They can also learn about its exhibits and legends, and discover who was buried in the tomb.

topics covered:
architecture, Civil War, government, history

contact info
Name: General Grant National Memorial
Phone: 212-666-1640.
Email: gegr_infor@nps.gov

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 45-60 minutes. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Email, Fax. Food Options: n/a. Cost: Free Title I or Financial Support: n/a. Accessible To: n/a.

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

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