Bayard Cutting Arboretum

Originally wooded a site, the development of the Bayard Cutting Arboretum began in 1887. It provides “an oasis of beauty and quite for the pleasure, rest and refreshment of those who delight in outdoor beauty” while bringing about “a greater appreciation and understanding of the value and importance of informal planting.” The Arboretum was donated to the Long Island State Park Region by Mrs. William Bayard Cutting and her daughter, Mrs. Olivia James, in memory of William Bayard Cutting. The site consists of a collection of fir, spruce, pine, cypress, hemlock, yew and other lesser known conifers. Contained within the collection are several trees which, regionally, are the largest of their species. Wildflowers and daffodils are feature in many native woodland locations. Combined with the site’s ponds and streamlets, there are ample opportunities to observe a broad range of land and aquatic birds and occasional glimpses of fox, raccoon and other small wildlife.

contact info

Hrs: Weekdays 10AM-4PM.

School

School field trips will include three tours on the groups of the arboretum, one of the many arboretum trails, Westbrook Manor and the Community Supported Agricultural (CSA) Farm. The students will enjoy a leisurely walk through the gardens making several stops along the way to learn about specific arboretum specimens. Students will be guided through the magnificent manor house, designed in 1886 by William Bayard Cutting, making stops in designated rooms. Following the manor house, students will tour the 14-acre farm to explore the garden and meet free range chickens.

supports classroom learning in:
Environmental Studies, Social Studies.

topics covered:
Ecosystems, animal science, history, plants, biology, agriculture.

contact info
Name: Karen Valdini
Email: karenvaldini@gmail.com

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 30 max. Program Type: Day Trips, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Activities, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 1.5-2.5 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1. Registration: Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own, Available for purchase, Picnic area available, Indoor and outdoor seating. Cost: Fee Accessible To: PD, HI, LD, ASD.

Botanical Garden Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

The diverse world of plants is perhaps the weirdest, and most fascinating, of all living things. Bamboo can grow over three feet in one day (you can literally watch it grow). There are 600 species of carnivorous plants, which trap and digest insects, frogs, or small birds (if a vegetarian eats this plant, are they still a vegetarian?). The world’s largest flower, Rafflesia, can grow up to three feet in diameter (how big would a bouquet be…). Do a little digging on your next trip to a botanical garden (not literally!), and see what interesting plant facts you can find. 

View Lesson Plan>>

Bayard Cutting Arboretum

Originally wooded a site, the development of the Bayard Cutting Arboretum began in 1887. It provides “an oasis of beauty and quite for the pleasure, rest and refreshment of those who delight in outdoor beauty” while bringing about “a greater appreciation and understanding of the value and importance of informal planting.” The Arboretum was donated to the Long Island State Park Region by Mrs. William Bayard Cutting and her daughter, Mrs. Olivia James, in memory of William Bayard Cutting. The site consists of a collection of fir, spruce, pine, cypress, hemlock, yew and other lesser known conifers. Contained within the collection are several trees which, regionally, are the largest of their species. Wildflowers and daffodils are feature in many native woodland locations. Combined with the site’s ponds and streamlets, there are ample opportunities to observe a broad range of land and aquatic birds and occasional glimpses of fox, raccoon and other small wildlife.

contact info

Hrs: Weekdays 10AM-4PM.

Scouts

Private ground and house tours for scout groups are available on Saturday mornings. Scouts can work on Plant Science and other science-related badges at the arboretum. The site consists of a collection of fir, spruce, pine, cypress, hemlock, yew and other lesser known conifers. Contained within the collection are several trees which, regionally, are the largest of their species. Wildflowers and daffodils are feature in many native woodland locations. Combined with the site’s ponds and streamlets, there are ample opportunities to observe a broad range of land and aquatic birds and occasional glimpses of fox, raccoon and other small wildlife. Advance reservations required.

supports scout badges in:
Science.

topics covered:
Plant science, ecosystems, biology, agriculture.

contact info
Name: Office
Phone: 631-581-1002

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 30 max. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 1.5-2.5 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1. Registration: Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own, Available for purchase, Picnic area available, Indoor and outdoor seating. Cost: Fee Accessible To: PD, HI, LD, ASD.

Botanical Garden Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

The diverse world of plants is perhaps the weirdest, and most fascinating, of all living things. Bamboo can grow over three feet in one day (you can literally watch it grow). There are 600 species of carnivorous plants, which trap and digest insects, frogs, or small birds (if a vegetarian eats this plant, are they still a vegetarian?). The world’s largest flower, Rafflesia, can grow up to three feet in diameter (how big would a bouquet be…). Do a little digging on your next trip to a botanical garden (not literally!), and see what interesting plant facts you can find. 

View Lesson Plan>>

Bayard Cutting Arboretum

Originally wooded a site, the development of the Bayard Cutting Arboretum began in 1887. It provides “an oasis of beauty and quite for the pleasure, rest and refreshment of those who delight in outdoor beauty” while bringing about “a greater appreciation and understanding of the value and importance of informal planting.” The Arboretum was donated to the Long Island State Park Region by Mrs. William Bayard Cutting and her daughter, Mrs. Olivia James, in memory of William Bayard Cutting. The site consists of a collection of fir, spruce, pine, cypress, hemlock, yew and other lesser known conifers. Contained within the collection are several trees which, regionally, are the largest of their species. Wildflowers and daffodils are feature in many native woodland locations. Combined with the site’s ponds and streamlets, there are ample opportunities to observe a broad range of land and aquatic birds and occasional glimpses of fox, raccoon and other small wildlife.

contact info

Hrs: Weekdays 10AM-4PM.

Camp

Campers will enjoy a leisurely walk through the gardens making several stops along the way to learn about specific arboretum specimens. Camp groups will take a guided tour through the manor house, which was designed in 1886 by William Bayard Cutting. After the tour of the manor house, campers will have a chance to visit the 14-acre farm, explore the garden, and meet free range chickens.

contact info
Name: Karen Valdini
Email: karenvaldini@gmail.com

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 30 max. Program Type: Day Trips, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Activities, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 1.5-2.5 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1. Registration: Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own, Available for purchase, Picnic area available, Indoor and outdoor seating. Cost: Fee

Botanical Garden Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

The diverse world of plants is perhaps the weirdest, and most fascinating, of all living things. Bamboo can grow over three feet in one day (you can literally watch it grow). There are 600 species of carnivorous plants, which trap and digest insects, frogs, or small birds (if a vegetarian eats this plant, are they still a vegetarian?). The world’s largest flower, Rafflesia, can grow up to three feet in diameter (how big would a bouquet be…). Do a little digging on your next trip to a botanical garden (not literally!), and see what interesting plant facts you can find. 

View Lesson Plan>>

Bayard Cutting Arboretum

Originally wooded a site, the development of the Bayard Cutting Arboretum began in 1887. It provides “an oasis of beauty and quite for the pleasure, rest and refreshment of those who delight in outdoor beauty” while bringing about “a greater appreciation and understanding of the value and importance of informal planting.” The Arboretum was donated to the Long Island State Park Region by Mrs. William Bayard Cutting and her daughter, Mrs. Olivia James, in memory of William Bayard Cutting. The site consists of a collection of fir, spruce, pine, cypress, hemlock, yew and other lesser known conifers. Contained within the collection are several trees which, regionally, are the largest of their species. Wildflowers and daffodils are feature in many native woodland locations. Combined with the site’s ponds and streamlets, there are ample opportunities to observe a broad range of land and aquatic birds and occasional glimpses of fox, raccoon and other small wildlife.

contact info

Hrs: Weekdays 10AM-4PM.

Homeschool

Homeschoolers can enjoy a leisurely walk through the gardens making several stops along the way to learn about specific arboretum specimens. They'll be guided through the magnificent manor house, designed in 1886 by William Bayard Cutting, making stops in designated rooms. After the manor house tour, homeschool groups will visit the 14-acre farm to explore the garden and meet free range chickens. Tours can be modified to your homeschool group's specific interests and curriculum goals.

topics covered:
Ecosystems, animal science, history, plants, biology, agriculture.

contact info
Name: Karen Valdini
Email: karenvaldini@gmail.com

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 30 max. Program Type: Day Trips, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Activities, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 1.5-2.5 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 15:1. Registration: Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own, Available for purchase, Picnic area available, Indoor and outdoor seating. Cost: Fee Accessible To: PD, HI, LD, ASD.

Botanical Garden Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

The diverse world of plants is perhaps the weirdest, and most fascinating, of all living things. Bamboo can grow over three feet in one day (you can literally watch it grow). There are 600 species of carnivorous plants, which trap and digest insects, frogs, or small birds (if a vegetarian eats this plant, are they still a vegetarian?). The world’s largest flower, Rafflesia, can grow up to three feet in diameter (how big would a bouquet be…). Do a little digging on your next trip to a botanical garden (not literally!), and see what interesting plant facts you can find. 

View Lesson Plan>>

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