Curran Homestead

The Curran Homestead is a 19th century living history farm and museum, dedicated to preserving and promoting the history of the rural Maine family farm. The Homestead raises an awareness of life in rural Maine and New England during the emerging Industrial Age and nurtures future inventors, scientists, mechanics and agriculturists. The Curran family operated a subsistence farm at the site with a dairy, poultry, flock, and vegetable crops. Several of the original buildings are located on the Homestead, as well as historic agricultural and domestic material culture and a recreated working blacksmith shop.

contact info

Hrs: March - October, By appointment.

Curran Homestead

At the Curran Homestead, students can learn unforgettable lessons in physics, mechanical energy and animal power, plant biology, metallurgy, and the history of early 20th century farming. Typically offered workshops include basic blacksmithing, metal casting, tools and hardware of the historic fur trade in Maine, and hand-forged door hinge making. Examples of seasonal programs are maple sugaring, apple cider making, cooking and canning home produce, and ice harvesting. Programs can be tailored to your group. Day programs include up to 5 workshops. The Homestead also hosts field trips at its Newfield location.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies, Science.

topics covered:
American History, Cooking, Farming, Industrial Revolution, Living History, Animals, Agriculture, Engineering, Physics, Sugaring.

contact info
Phone: 207-45-4426
Email: thecurranhomestead@gmail.com

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 20 min. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: Varies. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone. Food Options: Bring your own, Available for purchase, Picnic area available. Cost: Fee Title I or Financial Support: No.

Living History Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Two hundred thousand Civil War soldiers were boys no older than 16, and an estimated 300 women were brave enough to disguise themselves as men and fight in the war. The average soldier weighed only 145 pounds due to poor diet, long marches, disease, and tough living, and earned between $13-$16 per month. Reading about these facts is interesting, but actually living them makes the information come alive. Living History Centers can allow students to experience how people lived during important historical eras, including enlisting as a soldier during the Civil War.

View Lesson Plan>>

Curran Homestead

The Curran Homestead is a 19th century living history farm and museum, dedicated to preserving and promoting the history of the rural Maine family farm. The Homestead raises an awareness of life in rural Maine and New England during the emerging Industrial Age and nurtures future inventors, scientists, mechanics and agriculturists. The Curran family operated a subsistence farm at the site with a dairy, poultry, flock, and vegetable crops. Several of the original buildings are located on the Homestead, as well as historic agricultural and domestic material culture and a recreated working blacksmith shop.

contact info

Hrs: March - October, By appointment.

Curran Homestead

At the Curran Homestead, groups can learn unforgettable lessons in physics, mechanical energy and animal power, plant biology, metallurgy, and the history of early 20th century farming. Typically offered workshops include basic blacksmithing, metal casting, tools and hardware of the historic fur trade in Maine, and hand-forged door hinge making. Examples of seasonal programs are maple sugaring, apple cider making, cooking and canning home produce, and ice harvesting. Programs can be tailored to your group. The Homestead has hosted Pinewood Derby car-making workshops for Scouts. Field trips at the Newfield location are also offered.

supports scout badges in:
Social Studies, Science.

topics covered:
American History, Cooking, Farming, Industrial Revolution, Living History, Animals, Agriculture, Engineering, Physics, Sugaring.

contact info
Phone: 207-745-4426
Email: thecurranhomestead@gmail.com

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 20 min. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: Varies. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone. Food Options: Bring your own, Available for purchase, Picnic area available. Cost: Fee Title I or Financial Support: No.

Living History Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Two hundred thousand Civil War soldiers were boys no older than 16, and an estimated 300 women were brave enough to disguise themselves as men and fight in the war. The average soldier weighed only 145 pounds due to poor diet, long marches, disease, and tough living, and earned between $13-$16 per month. Reading about these facts is interesting, but actually living them makes the information come alive. Living History Centers can allow students to experience how people lived during important historical eras, including enlisting as a soldier during the Civil War.

View Lesson Plan>>

Curran Homestead

The Curran Homestead is a 19th century living history farm and museum, dedicated to preserving and promoting the history of the rural Maine family farm. The Homestead raises an awareness of life in rural Maine and New England during the emerging Industrial Age and nurtures future inventors, scientists, mechanics and agriculturists. The Curran family operated a subsistence farm at the site with a dairy, poultry, flock, and vegetable crops. Several of the original buildings are located on the Homestead, as well as historic agricultural and domestic material culture and a recreated working blacksmith shop.

contact info

Hrs: March - October, By appointment.

Curran Homestead

At the Curran Homestead, students can learn unforgettable lessons in physics, mechanical energy and animal power, plant biology, metallurgy, and the history of early 20th century farming. Typically offered workshops include basic blacksmithing, metal casting, tools and hardware of the historic fur trade in Maine, and hand-forged door hinge making. Examples of seasonal programs are maple sugaring, apple cider making, cooking and canning home produce, and ice harvesting. Programs can be tailored to your group. Day programs include up to 5 workshops. The Homestead also hosts field trips at its Newfield location.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies, Science.

topics covered:
American History, Cooking, Farming, Industrial Revolution, Living History, Animals, Agriculture, Engineering, Physics, Sugaring.

contact info
Phone: 207-745-4426
Email: thecurranhomestead@gmail.com

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 20 min. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: Varies. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone. Food Options: Bring your own, Available for purchase, Picnic area available. Title I or Financial Support: No.

Living History Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Two hundred thousand Civil War soldiers were boys no older than 16, and an estimated 300 women were brave enough to disguise themselves as men and fight in the war. The average soldier weighed only 145 pounds due to poor diet, long marches, disease, and tough living, and earned between $13-$16 per month. Reading about these facts is interesting, but actually living them makes the information come alive. Living History Centers can allow students to experience how people lived during important historical eras, including enlisting as a soldier during the Civil War.

View Lesson Plan>>

Curran Homestead

The Curran Homestead is a 19th century living history farm and museum, dedicated to preserving and promoting the history of the rural Maine family farm. The Homestead raises an awareness of life in rural Maine and New England during the emerging Industrial Age and nurtures future inventors, scientists, mechanics and agriculturists. The Curran family operated a subsistence farm at the site with a dairy, poultry, flock, and vegetable crops. Several of the original buildings are located on the Homestead, as well as historic agricultural and domestic material culture and a recreated working blacksmith shop.

contact info

Hrs: March - October, By appointment.

Curran Homestead

At the Curran Homestead, students can learn unforgettable lessons in physics, mechanical energy and animal power, plant biology, metallurgy, and the history of early 20th century farming. Typically offered workshops include basic blacksmithing, metal casting, tools and hardware of the historic fur trade in Maine, and hand-forged door hinge making. Examples of seasonal programs are maple sugaring, apple cider making, cooking and canning home produce, and ice harvesting. Programs can be tailored to your group. Day programs include up to 5 workshops. The Homestead also hosts field trips at its Newfield location.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies, Science.

topics covered:
American History, Cooking, Farming, Industrial Revolution, Living History, Animals, Agriculture, Engineering, Physics, Sugaring.

contact info
Phone: 207-745-4426
Email: thecurranhomestead@gmail.com

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 20 min. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: Varies. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone. Food Options: Bring your own, Available for purchase, Picnic area available. Cost: Fee Title I or Financial Support: No.

Living History Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Two hundred thousand Civil War soldiers were boys no older than 16, and an estimated 300 women were brave enough to disguise themselves as men and fight in the war. The average soldier weighed only 145 pounds due to poor diet, long marches, disease, and tough living, and earned between $13-$16 per month. Reading about these facts is interesting, but actually living them makes the information come alive. Living History Centers can allow students to experience how people lived during important historical eras, including enlisting as a soldier during the Civil War.

View Lesson Plan>>

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