North Carolina Executive Mansion

The North Carolina Executive Mansion, known as the “people’s house” is a Queen Anne style residence designed by Philadelphia architect Samuel Sloan and his assistant Aldophus Gustavus Bauer. The 19th-century mansion’s spacious entrance hallway is ninety feet long with sixteen-foot ceilings, visually divided by the fluted Corinthian columns. The columns were added in the mid-1920s, replacing earlier Victorian Romanesque Ionic columns. A designated Raleigh Historic Landmark, the mansion features ornate and historically rich ballrooms, libraries, and parlors. Once a sea of mud, groups will enjoy seeing the beautiful and lush gardens at the mansion that were brought into existence by First Lady Dorothy Martin. The mansion is open for student, scout, homeschool, and camp group tours by appointment.

contact info

Hrs: By appointment.

School

Students will be immersed in the Tar Heel State’s history while learning about the government on tours of the North Carolina Executive Mansion. Students will marvel at the mansion’s distinct architecture, paintings, and furnishings from the 18th and 19th centuries. During the tour, students will head outside to peruse the plants and artwork in the mansion’s Southern Victorian Garden, Vegetable and Cut Flower Garden, and the Kitchen Garden. In the Woodland Play Area, students can sit under the sugar maple tree, watch birds in the birdbath, and use play equipment. Field trip tour reservations must be made at least two weeks in advance. Booking begins in August.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
U.S. history, politics government, civics, historical figures, culture, science, plants, art.

contact info
Name: Tours
Phone: 919-715-3961

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 10 minimum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 1 hour. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone. Food Options: Bring Your Own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Free

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

North Carolina Executive Mansion

The North Carolina Executive Mansion, known as the “people’s house” is a Queen Anne style residence designed by Philadelphia architect Samuel Sloan and his assistant Aldophus Gustavus Bauer. The 19th-century mansion’s spacious entrance hallway is ninety feet long with sixteen-foot ceilings, visually divided by the fluted Corinthian columns. The columns were added in the mid-1920s, replacing earlier Victorian Romanesque Ionic columns. A designated Raleigh Historic Landmark, the mansion features ornate and historically rich ballrooms, libraries, and parlors. Once a sea of mud, groups will enjoy seeing the beautiful and lush gardens at the mansion that were brought into existence by First Lady Dorothy Martin. The mansion is open for student, scout, homeschool, and camp group tours by appointment.

contact info

Hrs: By appointment.

Camp

Camp groups will enjoy exploring the Tar Heel State’s history while learning about the government on tours of the North Carolina Executive Mansion. Campers will see the mansion’s distinct architecture, furniture, and paintings from the 18th and 19th centuries. The tour also gives campers a chance to visit the gardens, which feature wooden sculptures, brick walkways, roses, peonies, iris, and daisies, and more. Campers are welcome to use the play equipment in the Woodland Play Area. Please note that all backpacks must be left on the school bus. Tours must be booked at least two weeks in advance.

contact info
Name: Tours
Phone: 919-715-3961

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 10 minimum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 1 hour. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone. Cost: Free

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

North Carolina Executive Mansion

The North Carolina Executive Mansion, known as the “people’s house” is a Queen Anne style residence designed by Philadelphia architect Samuel Sloan and his assistant Aldophus Gustavus Bauer. The 19th-century mansion’s spacious entrance hallway is ninety feet long with sixteen-foot ceilings, visually divided by the fluted Corinthian columns. The columns were added in the mid-1920s, replacing earlier Victorian Romanesque Ionic columns. A designated Raleigh Historic Landmark, the mansion features ornate and historically rich ballrooms, libraries, and parlors. Once a sea of mud, groups will enjoy seeing the beautiful and lush gardens at the mansion that were brought into existence by First Lady Dorothy Martin. The mansion is open for student, scout, homeschool, and camp group tours by appointment.

contact info

Hrs: By appointment.

Homeschool

Homeschoolers will delve into the Tar Heel State’s history while learning about the government on field trips to the North Carolina Executive Mansion. On the tour, homeschoolers will marvel at the mansion’s architecture, paintings, and furnishings from the 1700s and 1800s. The tour continues outside, where homeschoolers can peruse the plants and artwork in the mansion’s various gardens. homeschoolers are welcome to use the play equipment in the Woodland Play Area. Tour reservations must be made at least two weeks ahead. Booking begins in August.

topics covered:
U.S. history, politics, government, civics, historical figures, culture, science, plants, art.

contact info
Name: Tours
Phone: 919-715-3961

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 10 minimum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 1 hour. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone. Food Options: Bring Your Own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Free

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

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