Stanley-Whitman House

Stanley-Whitman House preserves the colonial history of Farmington, Connecticut. Students, scouts, homeschoolers, and campers can visit the 18th-century house to see period furnishings, tour the apple orchard, interact with costumed re-enactors, and more. Groups will gain an understanding of Farmington’s local history, and the role Farmington citizens played in the forming of U.S. history. Gardens from two centuries allow learners to examine and imagine the pleasures and challenges of English gardeners in the new world. The living history center and museum also offers educational programs about colonial life and the American Revolution.

contact info

Hrs: See website.

School

Students can visit the Stanley-Whitman House to learn about colonial history, farming, customs, and the American Revolution. Students can have an overview of what harvest time was like in Farmington, learn about resources important to colonists and Native Americans, and visit the kitchen to learn about foods. Students can also explore the Memento Mori burying ground, or the colonial herb garden. The popular program From Our Point of View explores different sides of the Revolutionary War; students can help prepare a shipment of food, learn about slaves, study clothing and supplies for soldiers, and explore the reasons why some colonists remained loyal to England. Programs for middle and high school-aged students include opportunities to work with primary sources to learn about the Civil War, or even create their own family histories. Schedule a Revolutionary War Day for a whole day of program activities.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
American Revolution, colonial history, cooking, history, living history, plants, slavery.

contact info
Name: Joann Zeisner
Phone: 860-677-9222 ext. 304
Email: joann@stanleywhitman.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 15-35 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 90 minutes-5 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Fee

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

Stanley-Whitman House

Stanley-Whitman House preserves the colonial history of Farmington, Connecticut. Students, scouts, homeschoolers, and campers can visit the 18th-century house to see period furnishings, tour the apple orchard, interact with costumed re-enactors, and more. Groups will gain an understanding of Farmington’s local history, and the role Farmington citizens played in the forming of U.S. history. Gardens from two centuries allow learners to examine and imagine the pleasures and challenges of English gardeners in the new world. The living history center and museum also offers educational programs about colonial life and the American Revolution.

contact info

Hrs: See website.

Scouts

Scouts can visit the Stanley-Whitman House to learn about colonial history, farming, customs, and the American Revolution. Scout groups can have an overview of what harvest time was like in Farmington, learn about resources important to colonists and Native Americans, and visit the kitchen to learn about foods. Students can also explore the Memento Mori burying ground, or the colonial herb garden. The popular program From Our Point of View explores different sides of the Revolutionary War; scouts can help prepare a shipment of food, learn about slaves, study clothing and supplies for soldiers, and explore the reasons why some colonists remained loyal to England. Programs for middle and high school-aged scouts include opportunities to work with primary sources to learn about the Civil War, or even create their own family histories. Schedule a Revolutionary War Day for a whole day of program activities.

contact info
Name: Joann Zeisner
Phone: 860-677-9222 ext. 304
Email: joann@stanleywhitman.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 15-35 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 90 minutes-5 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone, Email.

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

Stanley-Whitman House

Stanley-Whitman House preserves the colonial history of Farmington, Connecticut. Students, scouts, homeschoolers, and campers can visit the 18th-century house to see period furnishings, tour the apple orchard, interact with costumed re-enactors, and more. Groups will gain an understanding of Farmington’s local history, and the role Farmington citizens played in the forming of U.S. history. Gardens from two centuries allow learners to examine and imagine the pleasures and challenges of English gardeners in the new world. The living history center and museum also offers educational programs about colonial life and the American Revolution.

contact info

Hrs: See website.

Camps

Campers can visit the Stanley-Whitman House, and explore six rooms dedicated to various aspects of colonial life. They will gain an appreciation of Farmington's local history as they learn about colonial cooking, chores, sleeping arrangements, and even toys and games. The Stanley-Whitman House has an exhibit gallery for visitors to explore colonial artwork and historical objects.

topics covered:
American Revolution, colonial history, cooking, history, living history, plants, slavery

contact info
Name: Joann Zeisner
Phone: 860-677-9222 ext. 304
Email: joann@stanleywhitman.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 1-3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Fee

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

Stanley-Whitman House

Stanley-Whitman House preserves the colonial history of Farmington, Connecticut. Students, scouts, homeschoolers, and campers can visit the 18th-century house to see period furnishings, tour the apple orchard, interact with costumed re-enactors, and more. Groups will gain an understanding of Farmington’s local history, and the role Farmington citizens played in the forming of U.S. history. Gardens from two centuries allow learners to examine and imagine the pleasures and challenges of English gardeners in the new world. The living history center and museum also offers educational programs about colonial life and the American Revolution.

contact info

Hrs: See website.

Homeschool

Homeschoolers can visit the Stanley-Whitman House to learn about colonial history, farming, customs, and the American Revolution. Homeschool groups can have an overview of what harvest time was like in Farmington, learn about resources important to colonists and Native Americans, and visit the kitchen to learn about foods. Homeschoolers can also explore the Memento Mori burying ground, or the colonial herb garden. The popular program From Our Point of View explores different sides of the Revolutionary War; homeschoolers can help prepare a shipment of food, learn about slaves, study clothing and supplies for soldiers, and explore the reasons why some colonists remained loyal to England. Programs for middle and high school-aged homeschool groups include opportunities to work with primary sources to learn about the Civil War, or even create their own family histories. Schedule a Revolutionary War Day for a whole day of program activities.

topics covered:
American Revolution, colonial history, cooking, history, living history, plants, slavery, social studies.

contact info
Name: Joann Zeisner
Phone: 860-677-9222 ext. 304
Email: joann@stanleywhitman.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 15-35 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 90 minutes-5 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: 10:1. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Fee

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

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