Nathan Hale Homestead

This site was home to state hero Nathan Hale, and his family. The house, constructed in 1776, has remained virtually intact ever since. Visit to learn about the everyday life of colonial families, and about the Hale family's ardent patriotism and involvement in the Revolutionary War. The site also offers three specialty tours: a landscape tour, hearth cooking tour, and tea programs.

contact info

Hrs: Vary by season.

School

Tours allow students to utilize objects and documents as they examine historical evidence or discover the ways both men and women expressed patriotism during the American Revolution. They can also explore the landscape, and view tasks associated with the running of the farm. Tours can be complemented with a variety of activities including working in the colonial kitchen, making fabric out of wool and flax, visiting a soldier encampment, writing with quill pens and ink, and deciphering coded letters.

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
American Revolution, colonial history, crafts, farming, writing.

contact info
Name: Program Coordinator
Phone: 860-742-6917
Email: hale@ctlandmarks.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Middle School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 2-3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Fee

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

Nathan Hale Homestead

This site was home to state hero Nathan Hale, and his family. The house, constructed in 1776, has remained virtually intact ever since. Visit to learn about the everyday life of colonial families, and about the Hale family's ardent patriotism and involvement in the Revolutionary War. The site also offers three specialty tours: a landscape tour, hearth cooking tour, and tea programs.

contact info

Hrs: Vary by season.

Scouts

Tours of the 18th-century homestead allow scouts to utilize objects and documents as they discover the ways men and women expressed patriotism during the American Revolution. They can also view tasks associated with the running of the farm. Tours can be complemented with a variety of activities including working in the colonial kitchen, making fabric, visiting a soldier encampment, writing with quill pens and ink, and deciphering coded letters.

supports scout badges in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
American Revolution, colonial history, crafts, farming, writing.

contact info
Name: Program Coordinator
Phone: 860-742-6917
Email: hale@ctlandmarks.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Middle School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 2-3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Fee

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

Nathan Hale Homestead

This site was home to state hero Nathan Hale, and his family. The house, constructed in 1776, has remained virtually intact ever since. Visit to learn about the everyday life of colonial families, and about the Hale family's ardent patriotism and involvement in the Revolutionary War. The site also offers three specialty tours: a landscape tour, hearth cooking tour, and tea programs.

contact info

Hrs: Vary by season.

Camp

Tours of the 18th-century homestead allow campers to utilize objects and documents as they discover the ways men and women expressed patriotism during the American Revolution. They can also view tasks associated with the running of the farm. Tours can be complemented with a variety of activities including working in the colonial kitchen, making fabric, visiting a soldier encampment, writing with quill pens and ink, and deciphering coded letters.

contact info
Name: Program Coordinator
Phone: 860-742-6917
Email: hale@ctlandmarks.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Middle School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 2-3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Fee

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

Nathan Hale Homestead

This site was home to state hero Nathan Hale, and his family. The house, constructed in 1776, has remained virtually intact ever since. Visit to learn about the everyday life of colonial families, and about the Hale family's ardent patriotism and involvement in the Revolutionary War. The site also offers three specialty tours: a landscape tour, hearth cooking tour, and tea programs.

contact info

Hrs: Vary by season.

Homeschool

Tours allow homeschoolers to utilize objects and documents as they examine historical evidence or discover the ways both men and women expressed patriotism during the American Revolution. They can also explore the landscape, and view tasks associated with the running of the farm. Tours can be complemented with a variety of activities including working in the colonial kitchen, making fabric out of wool and flax, visiting a soldier encampment, writing with quill pens and ink, and deciphering coded letters.

topics covered:
American Revolution, colonial history, crafts, farming, writing, social studies.

contact info
Name: Program Coordinator
Phone: 860-742-6917
Email: hale@ctlandmarks.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Middle School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 2-3 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Fee

Historic Site Lesson Plan

FUN FACTS

Philadelphia’s Independence Hall, where the Declaration of Independence and Constitution were signed; Boston’s Old State House, where the Boston Massacre and the American Revolution began; Washington D.C.’s National Mall, where Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech; Virginia’s Jamestown settlement, the country’s first colony; Charleston’s Fort Sumter, where the first shots of the Civil War were fired; New York’s Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, where millions of immigrants were introduced to their new home. All of these sites, significant to America’s history, can be visited, toured, and admired. While visiting one of the many historical sites around the country, consider the importance in preserving these sites.

View Lesson Plan>>

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