John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove

Visit the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove, located at the first place Audubon lived in the United States. The center showcases many of Audubon’s works, including a double-elephant folio version of Birds of America. Groups will enjoy a variety of activities on the 175-acre space such as hiking the trails, exploring the backyard creek, birding, scavenger hunts, and more.

contact info

Hrs: Tues.-Sat. 10AM-4PM, Sun. 1PM-4PM.

School

The John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove offers field trips on weekday mornings from 10AM-12PM. Field trip programs focus on topics such as ecology, the food web, and the life of John James Audubon. Activities include bird watching, owl pellet dissections, testing water, canoeing, and more. In February and early March, students can learn about the maple sugaring process, tree ecology, and the history of maple sugar. Programs cover PDE Environment and Ecology, Science, History, and Math Standards.

supports classroom learning in:
Science.

topics covered:
Biology, environmental studies, animal science, ecosystems, habitats, maple sugaring, ecology, nature, birds.

contact info
Name: Education Department
Phone: 610-666-5593 ext. 109
Email: jjac_education@audubon.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 120 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 25 minutes-2 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Online, Phone, Email, Mail. Food Options: Bring your own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Fee

Bird Watching Lesson Plan

Birds migrate to move from areas of low or decreasing resources to areas of high or increasing resources. The two primary resources being sought are food and nesting locations.

Birds that nest in the Northern Hemisphere tend to migrate northward in the spring to take advantage of burgeoning insect populations, budding plants and an abundance of nesting locations. As winter approaches and the availability of insects and other food drops, the birds move south again. Escaping the cold is a motivating factor but many species, including hummingbirds, can withstand freezing temperatures as long as an adequate supply of food is available.

View Lesson Plan>>

John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove

Visit the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove, located at the first place Audubon lived in the United States. The center showcases many of Audubon’s works, including a double-elephant folio version of Birds of America. Groups will enjoy a variety of activities on the 175-acre space such as hiking the trails, exploring the backyard creek, birding, scavenger hunts, and more.

contact info

Hrs: Tues.-Sat. 10AM-4PM, Sun. 1PM-4PM.

Scouts

Scout groups can work on Bird merit badges at the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove. On Saturday mornings at 8AM, the center offers free bird walks, during which scout groups can see all 20 required birds. Scouts will learn how to use binoculars, identify birds, and more. Bring lunch to eat at the pavilion or one of the center’s resting areas.

supports scout badges in:
Science.

topics covered:
Environmental science, animal science, nature, birds.

contact info
Name: Merit Badge Consular
Phone: 610-666-5593 ext. 108

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 2 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Online, Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Fee, Free

Bird Watching Lesson Plan

Birds migrate to move from areas of low or decreasing resources to areas of high or increasing resources. The two primary resources being sought are food and nesting locations.

Birds that nest in the Northern Hemisphere tend to migrate northward in the spring to take advantage of burgeoning insect populations, budding plants and an abundance of nesting locations. As winter approaches and the availability of insects and other food drops, the birds move south again. Escaping the cold is a motivating factor but many species, including hummingbirds, can withstand freezing temperatures as long as an adequate supply of food is available.

View Lesson Plan>>

John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove

Visit the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove, located at the first place Audubon lived in the United States. The center showcases many of Audubon’s works, including a double-elephant folio version of Birds of America. Groups will enjoy a variety of activities on the 175-acre space such as hiking the trails, exploring the backyard creek, birding, scavenger hunts, and more.

contact info

Hrs: Tues.-Sat. 10AM-4PM, Sun. 1PM-4PM.

Camp

Summer camp groups can participate in a variety of educational programs at the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove. Campers will learn about ecology, the life of John James Audubon, and more. Campers can enjoy canoeing, bird watching, and other activities. Bring lunch to eat with your campers at the pavilion or one of the center’s resting areas.

contact info
Name: Education Department
Phone: 610-666-5593 ext. 109
Email: jjac_education@audubon.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: All Grades Group Size: 120 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 2 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Online, Phone, Email. Food Options: Bring your own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Fee

Bird Watching Lesson Plan

Birds migrate to move from areas of low or decreasing resources to areas of high or increasing resources. The two primary resources being sought are food and nesting locations.

Birds that nest in the Northern Hemisphere tend to migrate northward in the spring to take advantage of burgeoning insect populations, budding plants and an abundance of nesting locations. As winter approaches and the availability of insects and other food drops, the birds move south again. Escaping the cold is a motivating factor but many species, including hummingbirds, can withstand freezing temperatures as long as an adequate supply of food is available.

View Lesson Plan>>

John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove

Visit the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove, located at the first place Audubon lived in the United States. The center showcases many of Audubon’s works, including a double-elephant folio version of Birds of America. Groups will enjoy a variety of activities on the 175-acre space such as hiking the trails, exploring the backyard creek, birding, scavenger hunts, and more.

contact info

Hrs: Tues.-Sat. 10AM-4PM, Sun. 1PM-4PM.

Homeschool

Homeschoolers will enjoy field trips to the John James Audubon Center at Mill Grove on weekday mornings from 10AM-12PM. Educational programs focus on ecology, the food web, and the life of John James Audubon. Field trip activities include bird watching, owl pellet dissections, canoeing, and more. In February and early March, homeschoolers can learn about the maple sugaring process, tree ecology, and the history of maple sugar.

topics covered:
Science, biology, environmental studies, animal science, ecosystems, habitats, maple sugaring, ecology, nature, birds, physical education.

contact info
Name: Education Department
Phone: 610-666-5593 ext. 109
Email: jjac_education@audubon.org

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School Group Size: 120 maximum. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours, Self-Guided Tours, Guided Activities. Recomm. Length of Visit: 25 minutes-2 hours. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Online, Phone, Email, Mail. Food Options: Bring your own, Outdoor Seating. Cost: Fee

Bird Watching Lesson Plan

Birds migrate to move from areas of low or decreasing resources to areas of high or increasing resources. The two primary resources being sought are food and nesting locations.

Birds that nest in the Northern Hemisphere tend to migrate northward in the spring to take advantage of burgeoning insect populations, budding plants and an abundance of nesting locations. As winter approaches and the availability of insects and other food drops, the birds move south again. Escaping the cold is a motivating factor but many species, including hummingbirds, can withstand freezing temperatures as long as an adequate supply of food is available.

View Lesson Plan>>

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