Connecticut Supreme Court

More than 100 years old and the highest court in Connecticut, the External Affairs Division of the Connecticut Judicial Branch provides tours of the Supreme Court courtroom on weekdays. Formerly known as the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors, the building in which the court is housed is also home to the State Library, and Museum of Connecticut History. Students, scouts, homeschoolers, and campers will have the chance to explore the judicial branch on tours of the building.

contact info

Hrs: Mon.-Fri. 9AM-5PM.

School

A visit will show students the importance of the courtroom and how it differs from the Superior and Appellate courthouses in Connecticut. School groups will gaze at the portraits of retired Chief Justices, sit in the courtroom, and view the state’s history, from the beautiful state oak tree panels that cover the walls, to the two famous murals that grace the wall and ceiling. On certain days, one lucky student will have the opportunity to role-play as court marshal for the day!

supports classroom learning in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
History, government, civics, law, judicial system, historical figures.

contact info
Phone: 860-757-2270
Email: external.affairs@jud.ct.gov

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School, High School, College Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 45 minutes. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Free

Judicial Lesson Plan

Where the Executive and Legislative branches are elected by the people, members of the Judicial Branch are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

The courts only try actual cases and controversies — a party must show that it has been harmed in order to bring suit in court. Cases brought before the judiciary typically proceed from district court to appellate court and may even end at the Supreme Court, although the Supreme Court hears comparatively few cases each year.

View Lesson Plan>>

Connecticut Supreme Court

More than 100 years old and the highest court in Connecticut, the External Affairs Division of the Connecticut Judicial Branch provides tours of the Supreme Court courtroom on weekdays. Formerly known as the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors, the building in which the court is housed is also home to the State Library, and Museum of Connecticut History. Students, scouts, homeschoolers, and campers will have the chance to explore the judicial branch on tours of the building.

contact info

Hrs: Mon.-Fri. 9AM-5PM.

Scouts

A visit will show scout troops the importance of the courtroom and how it differs from the Superior and Appellate courthouses in Connecticut. Scouts will gaze at the portraits of retired Chief Justices, sit in the courtroom, and view the state’s history, from the beautiful state oak tree panels that cover the walls, to the two famous murals that grace the wall and ceiling. On certain days, one lucky scout will have the opportunity to role-play as court marshal for the day!

supports scout badges in:
Social Studies.

topics covered:
History, government, civics, law, judicial system, historical figures.

contact info
Phone: 860-757-2270
Email: external.affairs@jud.ct.gov

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School, High School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 45 minutes. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Free

Judicial Lesson Plan

Where the Executive and Legislative branches are elected by the people, members of the Judicial Branch are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

The courts only try actual cases and controversies — a party must show that it has been harmed in order to bring suit in court. Cases brought before the judiciary typically proceed from district court to appellate court and may even end at the Supreme Court, although the Supreme Court hears comparatively few cases each year.

View Lesson Plan>>

Connecticut Supreme Court

More than 100 years old and the highest court in Connecticut, the External Affairs Division of the Connecticut Judicial Branch provides tours of the Supreme Court courtroom on weekdays. Formerly known as the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors, the building in which the court is housed is also home to the State Library, and Museum of Connecticut History. Students, scouts, homeschoolers, and campers will have the chance to explore the judicial branch on tours of the building.

contact info

Hrs: Mon.-Fri. 9AM-5PM.

Camp

A visit will show campers the importance of the courtroom and how it differs from the Superior and Appellate courthouses in Connecticut. Camp groups will gaze at the portraits of retired Chief Justices, sit in the courtroom, and view the state’s history, from the beautiful state oak tree panels that cover the walls, to the two famous murals that grace the wall and ceiling. On certain days, one lucky student will have the opportunity to role-play as court marshal for the day!

contact info
Phone: 860-757-2270
Email: external.affairs@jud.ct.gov

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School, High School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 45 minutes. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Free

Judicial Lesson Plan

Where the Executive and Legislative branches are elected by the people, members of the Judicial Branch are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

The courts only try actual cases and controversies — a party must show that it has been harmed in order to bring suit in court. Cases brought before the judiciary typically proceed from district court to appellate court and may even end at the Supreme Court, although the Supreme Court hears comparatively few cases each year.

View Lesson Plan>>

Connecticut Supreme Court

More than 100 years old and the highest court in Connecticut, the External Affairs Division of the Connecticut Judicial Branch provides tours of the Supreme Court courtroom on weekdays. Formerly known as the Connecticut Supreme Court of Errors, the building in which the court is housed is also home to the State Library, and Museum of Connecticut History. Students, scouts, homeschoolers, and campers will have the chance to explore the judicial branch on tours of the building.

contact info

Hrs: Mon.-Fri. 9AM-5PM.

Homeschool

A visit will show homeschoolers the importance of the courtroom and how it differs from the Superior and Appellate courthouses in Connecticut. Homeschool groups will gaze at the portraits of retired Chief Justices, sit in the courtroom, and view the state’s history, from the beautiful state oak tree panels that cover the walls, to the two famous murals that grace the wall and ceiling. On certain days, one lucky student will have the opportunity to role-play as court marshal for the day!

topics covered:
History, government, civics, law, judicial system, historical figures, social studies.

contact info
Name: 860-757-2270
Email: external.affairs@jud.ct.gov

TRIP INFO

Grade Level: Elementary School, Middle School, High School Group Size: Varies. Program Type: Day Trips, Guided Tours. Recomm. Length of Visit: 45 minutes. Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies.Recommended Ratio of Youth to Chaperones: Varies. Registration: Phone, Email. Cost: Free

Judicial Lesson Plan

Where the Executive and Legislative branches are elected by the people, members of the Judicial Branch are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate.

The courts only try actual cases and controversies — a party must show that it has been harmed in order to bring suit in court. Cases brought before the judiciary typically proceed from district court to appellate court and may even end at the Supreme Court, although the Supreme Court hears comparatively few cases each year.

View Lesson Plan>>

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